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Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

  • “Archiving Dracula: Knowledge Acquisition and Interdisciplinarity,” Nineteenth-Century Contexts (forthcoming)

Edited Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor, with Doreen Thierauf, Generational Exchange and Transition in Women’s Writing, special issue of Women’s Writing, vol. 26, no. 2, 2019.

Awards

  • Evan Frankel Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.


Ian Murray

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, State University of New York at Buffalo

2009, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate currently writing my dissertation on how late 18th and early 19th century Americans conceptualized broad ideas of experience and possibility. I also teach in the department — most frequently first-year writing, but also literature classes such as mystery fiction and early American literature. Outside of the classroom, I am fascinated by games of all kinds.


emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

  • 2017, BA Critical Studies in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
  • 2017, BA Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez is a first-generation migrant and a PhD. student—in that order—through the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As both poet and scholar, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry. Focusing on 20th-century hemispheric experimental poetry, their dissertation (tentatively titled Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric) probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas through the lens of Neobaroque aesthetics, tracing dissonant and dissident relations in the life and work of figures such as Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Néstor Perlongher, and Cecilia Vicuña. emilio’s first book of poetry, landskips (words are a hard look), a latinX exploration of the sonics and optics of our contemporary American Landscapes, is forthcoming through The Concern Newsstand.


Publications:


Teaching Awards

  • Latina/o Studies Teaching Grant – 2020

Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Eric Bontempo

April 20, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and French, Harding University

2017, MA English, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

Bio

Eric Bontempo is a third-year PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. His interests include nineteenth-century poetics, British Romanticism, aesthetic theory, and postsecular studies.


Publications:

  • “In Memoriam:  Reader-Response and the Virtual Construction of Consolation.” The International Journal of Critical Cultural Studies, vol. 14. no. 4 (2016), pp. 11-18.

Awards

  • UNC Center for Global Initiatives REACH Fellow, Summer 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jessica Slavic Drexel

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2014, MA Linguistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2012, BA German & Latin, Hillsdale College

Bio

I am a comparative modernist scholar specializing in Anglo-American and European poetry and poetics. My dissertation focuses on the poetic epiphany in modernist and secular aesthetic frameworks in Anglo-American and German traditions, with particular attention given to William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, and Rainer Maria Rilke. My analytical framework draws on literary, religious, and philosophical traditions as I examine the phenomenon of the secular epiphany in the twentieth century. In addition to my research, I recently received an award for excellence in teaching English rhetoric and composition at UNC. For this class, I employ a genre-awareness approach that emphasizes interdisciplinary skills such as research, developing a writing process through peer review and revision, and digital literacy; I have particularly enjoyed developing units on film analysis and career readiness.


Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindeman Teaching Award for Composition and Literature, 2017

Curriculum Vitae / Resume