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Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

2015, MA English, The Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies at The University of Alabama

2013, BA English, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature and the history of medicine. Her research interests include patient-caregiver exchanges, performances of care, and the material experiences of illness. She is more broadly interested in early modern approaches to human bodies (“be they alive or dead”) and the senses.

Her most recent presentations explore the role of the physician in Donne’s Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions the relationship between of olfaction and practices of reading in the sixteenth century.

Fowler is also interested in the medical humanities more generally and has a background in health sciences writing from her time as an editor and writer with The University of Alabama’s Institute for Rural Health Research.

She completed her master’s thesis, “They are gone to read upon me:” The Donnean Body-Text, with the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance studies.


Leslie Rowen

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA English, Bellarmine University

2017, BA Spanish, Bellarmine Univesity

Bio

Leslie Rowen studies 20th Century American literature with a focus on the literature of war. Her research concentrates on under-studied soldier writing, with a particular interest in race, gender expression, and trauma. By nature this work relies heavily on the archive, and occasionally extends into the field of medical humanities.


Teaching Awards

  • Professional Development Teaching Award, Department of English & Comparative Literature, Spring 2021, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award, Fall 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Awards

  • Center for the Study of the American South Summer Research Grant, Summer 2021, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • James Peacock REACH Fellowship, Center for Global Initiatives, Summer 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian S. Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature, primarily drama placed in its religiopolitical and material contexts. His research interests include the histories of religion and emotion, occult knowledge, and literary representations of the Devil. His most recent publication places William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in its contemporary religious and scientific contexts by exploring the toxicological roles of night, crypts, and demons in the play. He has previously delivered papers on the Devil and humor in Ben Jonson’s The Devil is an Ass, Paracelsianism in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and medieval theories of predestination in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Smith’s current project interrogates the relationship between the reception of Calvinist doctrine and “horror” as an affect in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century tragedy, epic, and sermons.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • Forthcoming. “‘No healthsome air breathes in’: Spiritual Poison in Romeo and Juliet,” Poison on the Early Modern Stage, edited by Lisa Hopkins and Kibrina Davey (Manchester University Press).

Media & Impact

Curatorial Work


Awards

  • ARPA Graduate Degree Completion Grant, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Eating through the Archives: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Early Modern Foodways Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, December 2019
  • Sara Malone Conference Grant, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, May 2019
  • Florence Hoagland Memorial Award for Outstanding Senior English Major, Bethany College Department of Humanities, Spring 2015
  • W. F. Kennedy Prize for Outstanding Junior Man, Bethany College, Spring 2014
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Junior English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2014
  • Bettie Blanck Travel Award, BC Department of Humanities, Fall 2013
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Sophomore English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics. My dissertation, “Changeling Humorists: The Speech Acts of the Early Modern English Fool,” traces the intellectual history of the fool figure through the seventeenth century. It explores how the fool democratizes an access to public voice and transfers a form of sovereignty to its audience. Currently, I am also editing Robert Armin’s Quips upon Questions for Digital Renaissance Editions.


Publications:

  • Robert Armin, Quips upon Questions, in Digital Renaissance Editions. University of Victoria.
  • Review of Worthen, W. B. Shakespeare, Technicity and the Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2020. In Shakespeare Quarterly (forthcoming).
  • Review of Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018): 1554-1555.
  • Review of  Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. In Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018): 175-177.

Teaching Awards

  • 2020 Latina/o Studies Teaching Award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Awards

External 

  • 2020       UCLA Clark Library/Center for Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Studies Predoctoral Fellowship
  • 2019       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology
  • 2018       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       NEMLA Graduate Student Travel Grant

Internal

  • 2021       Howell-Voitle Award for Dissertation in Early Modern English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Medieval and Early Modern Summer Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Eliason Dissertation Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Medieval and Early Modern Society Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019       The Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018       Travel Grant, Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017       Wilma Ebbitt Fellowship in Rhetoric, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.


Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a PhD candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests include twentieth-century American literature, women’s and gender studies, queer of color critique, and animal studies. She has completed two peer-reviewed publications: one explores Black feminist theories of embodiment and nature in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, forthcoming from Society & Animals; and the other offers an archival analysis of Zora Neale Hurston’s brief tenure at UNC and NCCU, published by North Carolina Literary Review in May 2020. Rachel also co-directs the graduate working group Literature, Medicine and Culture Colloquium (LMCC) which explores topics in health humanities. Finally, Rachel regularly teaches courses in rhetoric and composition, LGBTQIA+ literature and culture, and the history of horror literature and cinema. She is currently working on her dissertation, a literary and cultural history of female masculinity in American modernism.

 


Publications:

“Zora Neale Hurston in North Carolina: Drama, Education, and Contemporary Activism.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 29, August 2020.

“‘A Winged but Grounded Bird’: Morrison’s Mixed Treatment of Animality in The Bluest Eye.” Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies. (forthcoming spring 2021)

“A Crisis in (Female) Masculinity: My Ántonia & the Imaginative Recreation of the Western Frontier.” The Routledge Companion to Masculinity in American Literature and Culture, edited by Lydia Cooper and Joana Conings. (forthcoming spring 2021)

““The Poems and the Dances of the Shades’: Destabilizing Psychological Theories of Grief in The Year of Magical Thinking.” Death Within the Text: Social, Philosophical and Aesthetic Approaches to Literature, edited by Adriana Teodorescu (2018): 10-27.


Awards

Eliason Dissertation Summer Research Fellowship, 2020

MLA COVID-19 Emergency Grant, Modern Language Association, 2020

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2020

Paul Green Prize, North Carolina Literary Review, 2019

Student Learning Circle Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2019

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2018

Deborah W. Shelton Endowment for Graduate Travel Awards, ECL Department, 2018

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2017

Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Awards Fund, 2016

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2016


Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

“Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems,” Literature and Belief 37.2, 2017. 45-61.

“Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry,” The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes. Winter 2016-17.

Reference Article

“Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake,” in Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, ed. Professor April London (Cambridge University Press), forthcoming.


Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael J. Clark

April 6, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Colby College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature and a Graduate Teaching Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill. As a comparatist, I’ve studied Italian, Spanish, ancient Greek, Latin, Old English, Irish, and French, and my research interests include Renaissance literature, the history of medicine, theater studies, translation studies, classical reception, writing center studies, and pedagogy.

My dissertation “Deceptive Medicine and (Dis)Trust in Renaissance Drama” examines interactions between patients and medical practitioners in English, Italian, and French Renaissance comedies. The project explores how questions of trust and distrust in medical authority are reflected and dramatized in Renaissance theater.

My cross-disciplinary teaching experience has included Italian language courses, first-year composition courses, and literature survey courses. I also served for four years as a coach at the UNC Writing Center, providing one-on-one writing feedback and sharing composition strategies with more than 1000 unique students.

When not teaching, writing, or conducting research, I like to travel the world and to sing in a local community chorus.


Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2019
  • Literature Teaching Award, 2016
  • Foreign Language Teaching Award, 2016
  • Engaged Instructor Award, 2015

Awards

  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, 2020
  • McLendon-Thomas Award in the History of Medicine, 2018
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-Aid, 2015

Curriculum Vitae / Resume