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Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jessica Ginocchio

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.A.T. Secondary English Education, Duke University

2013, M.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

2011, B.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bio

Jessica’s research focuses on late 19th and early 20th century Russian and German fiction, with special interests in the depictions of animals and death in literature. Key authors for her include Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Kafka, and Mann. She has been studying Russian since 2007 and has studied in St. Petersburg, Moscow, and Kiev. She has taught Russian language courses and TA’d for Russian and German culture courses in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, as well as tutors for the new UNC Russian Flagship Program.

 

 


Awards

  • UNC CSEEES Summer Research & Language Study Award, 2021
  • FLAS Fellowship, Summer 2012 (Russian)

Elizabeth Shand

October 10, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA in English and Correlate in Art History, Vassar College

Bio

My research stitches together questions from media studies, book history, and Victorian criticism. I am interested in the shifting relationships between print’s material and textual uses, particularly as it responds to new technologies of the book in the nineteenth century.  In my research and teaching, I privilege diverse methods of critical agency. To this end, I engage with interdisciplinary approaches from material studies, book history, digital humanities, and literary criticism.


Publications:

  • Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles
    • “The Critical Insurgency of Austen’s Suffrage Afterlife: ‘I hope I shall not be accused of pride and prejudice,’” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, forthcoming.
    • “Enfolded Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall: Refusing ‘a perfect work of art’, Brontë Studies (forthcoming)
    • “Women’s Reading as Protest in Gissing’s The Odd Women: ‘I’ll see how I like this first,’” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62:1 (2019): 53-71.

    Reference Articles

    • “Helen Blackburn,” Encyclopedia of Victorian Women’s Writing, eds. Emily Morris and Lesa Scholl, Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2017-2018

Awards

  • Elsie Van Dyck Dewitt Scholarship Fund Fellowship (2018/2019)
  • Rare Book School Director’s Fellowship (2018)
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Course Fellowship (2018)
  • North American Victorian Studies Association Travel Grant (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Initiative Fellow (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship (2017)
  • The Robert M. and Janet Lumiansky Graduate Student Excellence Fund in English (2016)
  • W. Bruce Lea Jr. Graduate Fund in English (2016)
  • Ford Scholar, Vassar College (2010)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian S. Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature, primarily drama placed in its religiopolitical and material contexts. His research interests include the histories of religion and emotion, occult knowledge, and literary representations of the Devil. His most recent publication places William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in its contemporary religious and scientific contexts by exploring the toxicological roles of night, crypts, and demons in the play. He has previously delivered papers on the Devil and humor in Ben Jonson’s The Devil is an Ass, Paracelsianism in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and medieval theories of predestination in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Smith’s current project interrogates the relationship between the reception of Calvinist doctrine and “horror” as an affect in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century tragedy, epic, and sermons.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • Forthcoming. “‘No healthsome air breathes in’: Spiritual Poison in Romeo and Juliet,” Poison on the Early Modern Stage, edited by Lisa Hopkins and Kibrina Davey (Manchester University Press).

Media & Impact

Curatorial Work


Awards

  • ARPA Graduate Degree Completion Grant, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Eating through the Archives: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Early Modern Foodways Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, December 2019
  • Sara Malone Conference Grant, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, May 2019
  • Florence Hoagland Memorial Award for Outstanding Senior English Major, Bethany College Department of Humanities, Spring 2015
  • W. F. Kennedy Prize for Outstanding Junior Man, Bethany College, Spring 2014
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Junior English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2014
  • Bettie Blanck Travel Award, BC Department of Humanities, Fall 2013
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Sophomore English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

I am I fourth-year Ph.D. student studying the overlap of friendship, loyalty, and virtue in Late Medieval Romance. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. I like to write, craft, sing, travel, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, and bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”).


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics. My dissertation, “Changeling Humorists: The Speech Acts of the Early Modern English Fool,” traces the intellectual history of the fool figure through the seventeenth century. It explores how the fool democratizes an access to public voice and transfers a form of sovereignty to its audience. Currently, I am also editing Robert Armin’s Quips upon Questions for Digital Renaissance Editions.


Publications:

  • Robert Armin, Quips upon Questions, in Digital Renaissance Editions. University of Victoria.
  • Review of Worthen, W. B. Shakespeare, Technicity and the Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2020. In Shakespeare Quarterly (forthcoming).
  • Review of Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018): 1554-1555.
  • Review of  Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. In Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018): 175-177.

Teaching Awards

  • 2020 Latina/o Studies Teaching Award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Awards

External 

  • 2020       UCLA Clark Library/Center for Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Studies Predoctoral Fellowship
  • 2019       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology
  • 2018       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       NEMLA Graduate Student Travel Grant

Internal

  • 2021       Howell-Voitle Award for Dissertation in Early Modern English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Medieval and Early Modern Summer Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Eliason Dissertation Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Medieval and Early Modern Society Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019       The Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018       Travel Grant, Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017       Wilma Ebbitt Fellowship in Rhetoric, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Dylan Thompson

July 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, University of Oregon

Bio

I study late medieval English and Italian literature, focusing primarily on the works of Dante and Chaucer. I’m also especially interested in folk music, vernacular and vulgar literary traditions, and religion.


Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

  • “Archiving Dracula: Knowledge Acquisition and Interdisciplinarity,” Nineteenth-Century Contexts (forthcoming)

Edited Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor, with Doreen Thierauf, Generational Exchange and Transition in Women’s Writing, special issue of Women’s Writing, vol. 26, no. 2, 2019.

Awards

  • Evan Frankel Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)