Elizabeth Shand

October 10, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA in English and Correlate in Art History, Vassar College

Bio

Liz Shand is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research stitches together questions from media studies, book history, gender studies, and Victorian criticism. She is particularly interested in the dominant depictions of women’s reading in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through analyses of print culture, material studies, and the history of technology, she is interested in the way that women accessed and shared texts within and outside of dominant reading networks.

Aside from her research, Liz integrates design and digital writing in her research and pedagogy. She has developed design resources and guides for UNC’s Design Lab and for Wilson Special Collections Library and has worked in the Digital Innovation Lab.


Publications:

  • “Enfolded Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall: Refusing ‘a perfect work of art’, Brontë Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Women’s Reading as Protest in Gissing’s The Odd Women: ‘I’ll see how I like this first,’” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62:1 (2019): 53-71.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2017-2018

Awards

  • Elsie Van Dyck Dewitt Scholarship Fund Fellowship (2018/2019)
  • Rare Book School Director’s Fellowship (2018)
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Course Fellowship (2018)
  • North American Victorian Studies Association Travel Grant (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Initiative Fellow (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship (2017)
  • The Robert M. and Janet Lumiansky Graduate Student Excellence Fund in English (2016)
  • W. Bruce Lea Jr. Graduate Fund in English (2016)
  • Ford Scholar, Vassar College (2010)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature. His research focuses on exchanges among drama, philosophy, politics, and theology in pre- and post-reformation Europe. He is particularly interested in the ways reformation theology modified English theatrical tradition.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

  • Guest editor, with Doreen Thierauf, of a special issue of Women’s Writing on “Generations” (forthcoming 2018)

Awards

  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

Lanier Walker

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Harvard University

2015, postgraduate study, History of Design, Royal College of Art/ Victoria & Albert Museum

Bio

Lanier’s research interests include early modern drama, material culture, and the history of the book. In her free time, she is an avid baker and printmaker.


Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow

Ian Murray

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, State University of New York at Buffalo

2009, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate currently writing my dissertation on how late 18th and early 19th century Americans conceptualized broad ideas of experience and possibility. I also teach in the department — most frequently first-year writing, but also literature classes such as mystery fiction and early American literature. Outside of the classroom, I am fascinated by games of all kinds.