Michele Robinson

June 13, 2018

Degrees

2009, BA English, Kenyon College

2011, MA Humanities with English focus, University of Chicago

Bio

Michele Robinson is pursuing a minor in Women’s and Gender studies and her dissertation focuses on the role of space and gender in nineteenth century literature. She has enjoyed teaching courses like English 105, 123 Into to Fiction: Gendered Politics of Madness and Mental Illness, and 129 Literature and Cultural Diversity.


Awards

  • Julius Sylvester Hanner Memorial Fellowship
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Prize

Che Sokol

April 27, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and French Literature, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Bio

While my interests are varied–from British Modernism to North African Cinema to RPG tabletop and videogames–my current research focuses on gender and sexuality in French and North African Film. While I usually teach French language classes, I also have a background in Women’s and Gender Studies, Global Cinema, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic. As a Comparative Literature student, I enjoy doing interdisciplinary work through different departments at UNC, including English and Comparative Literature, Romance Studies, Asian Studies, and African Studies.


Awards

  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2016
  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2018

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

  • Guest editor, with Doreen Thierauf, of a special issue of Women’s Writing on “Generations” (forthcoming 2018)

Awards

  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

Bridget C. Donnelly

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, Lawrence University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and I specialize in British literature of the long eighteenth century and the history of the novel. My dissertation project considers shifting discourses surrounding accidental events throughout the eighteenth century, framing the analysis around fictional representations of carriage accidents in texts like Tobias Smollett’s Humphry Clinker, Frances Burney’s Evelina, Mary Hays’s Memoirs of Emma Courtney, and Jane Austen’s Love and Friendship. 


Publications:

  • “‘Chequer-Work[s] of Providence’: Skeptical Providentialism in Daniel Defoe’s Fiction.” Philosophy and Literature. Forthcoming.
  • Five entries in The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820. Ed. April London. Cambridge University Press. Forthcoming 2018.

Awards

  • W.M. Keck Foundation Fellowship for research at the Huntington Library, awarded March 2018
  • Huntington Library Travel Grant to the United Kingdom, awarded March 2018
  • Aubrey Williams Research Travel Grant, American Society for 18th-Century Studies, awarded March 2018
  • Jerry Leath Mills/Studies in Philology Travel Award for archival research in England, awarded October 2017
  • Best Graduate Student Paper, International Society for the Study of Narrative, awarded June 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Edward Hyunsoo Yang

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Literature and Political Science, Loyola Marymount University

2015, MA English, Claremont Graduate University

Bio

My research interests include the history of the novel, narrative performance, and authenticity. Drawing from British novels of the Long Eighteenth Century and Twentieth Century American novels, I hope to produce a project that examines narrative interruptions: moments in a text when a voice, distinct from that of any other character, enters the narrative.

Some of my past research examines: the performance of authenticity in The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey, competing narrative frames in Frankenstein, a blending of genres in The Castle of Otranto, resistance to introspection in Mumblecore films, and the role of authenticity in Hip Hop.


Awards

  • Fulbright, English Teaching Assistantship (Germany), 2016-17

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Anne Fertig

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, Honors BA English Literature, Rollins College
2014, MLitt Scottish History, University of Glasgow
2015, MPhil English Literature, University of Glasgow

Bio

Anne Fertig is currently a doctoral student in English Literature. Her research centers around history writing in the long eighteenth century, including historiography, historical fiction, and antiquarianism. With interest in the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism, her work uses English, Scots, and Scottish Gaelic to explore the intersections of culture and language in Scotland and Britain. She was a former Fulbright Postgraduate Scholar at the University of Glasgow (2013-2014) and the co-editor of A Song of Glasgow Town: The Collected Poems of Marion Bernstein (Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 2013).


Publications:

  • “Castle Howard”; “Conirdan”; “Julius Fitz-John,” The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, (Forthcoming).
  • “’Ancient, Hardy, Pugnacious, and Poor’: Margaret Oliphant’s Form and Conformation in ‘Scottish National Character’ and Kirsteen.” The Essay: Forms and Transformations. (Universitätsverlag Winter: Heidelburg, 2017)
  • Cohen,  Edward H. and Anne Fertig, “A Curious Exchange between Marion Bernstein and Mary Inglis,” Studies in Scottish Literature 41 (2016): 267-276.
  • Cohen,  Edward H. and Anne Fertig,  “Marion Bernstein and the Glasgow Weekly Mail in the 1870s,” Victorian Periodical Review 49.1 (2016): 9-27.
  • Cohen, Edward H., Anne Fertig, and Linda Fleming, eds. ‘A Song of Glasgow Town’: the Collected Works of Marion Bernstein. (Association of Scottish Literary Studies: Glasgow, 2013)

Awards

  • Merit Assistant Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2015-2016
  • Fulbright Postgraduate Scholarship, University of Glasgow, 2013-2014

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Bass Connections Program at Duke University. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of the Digital Literacy and Communication Lab.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Student Undergraduate Teaching Award,Office of the Chancellor, UNC-CH, $1000. 2019.
  • C.S. Herschel Award for Course Design, Digital Humanities, University Writing Program, UNC-CH, $250. 2019.
  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Rhodes Data Initiative Bass Connections Graduate Fellowship, Duke University. $17,500, 2019-2020.
  • Frank Porter Graham Honor Society Member, UNC-CH Graduate School, UNC-CH. 2019
  • Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant with Dan Anderson, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNC-CH, $8000. 2018.
  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Digital Literacy Fellowship, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $5000, 2017-2018.
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2016-2017.
  • Hanner Fellowship, Dept. of English and Comparative Lit., UNC-CH. $17500, 2015-2016.

Rachael Isom

April 22, 2018

Degrees

  • 2013, MA English, Murray State University
  • 2011, BA English, Murray State University

Bio

Rachael Isom is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She studies the intersections of religious and poetic identity in nineteenth-century British women’s writing, with particular interest in Romantic-era discourses of enthusiasm, reflection, and feminine restraint. Her dissertation project, “Enthusiastic Poetics and the Woman Writer, 1806-1856,” traces the development of the female enthusiast from Mary Shelley to Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Isom’s work has recently appeared or is forthcoming in Essays in RomanticismThe Journal of Commonwealth LiteratureStudies in Romanticism, and the Keats-Shelley Review. Currently, she serves as Managing Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal and works as a Project Assistant for the William Blake Archive.


Publications:

  • “Prophetic Poetics and Enthusiasm in Mary Shelley’s Valperga,” Studies in Romanticism, forthcoming.
  • “John Watson Dalby’s Poetic Reception of Mary Shelley’s Valperga,” Keats-Shelley Review, forthcoming.
  • “‘With Faithful Pencil’: Pastoral and Picturesque Composition in Beachy Head,” in Placing Charlotte Smith, ed. Jacqueline M. Labbe and Elizabeth A. Dolan (Lehigh University Press, forthcoming).
  • “‘Do you think I can’t read between the lines?’: Discourse of the Unsaid in J. M. Coetzee’s Diary of a Bad Year,” The Journal of Commonwealth Literature 53.1 (2018): 7-20.
  • “‘Habituat[ing] to Reflection’: Hannah More’s Romantic Novel,” Essays in Romanticism 23.1 (2016): 95-112.
  • “Caroline Fry’s Death, and Other Poems in Conversation with the Night Thoughts of Edward Young,” New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century 2.1 (2014): 63-74.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching First-Year Composition, 2015

Awards

  • W. M. Keck Foundation Short-Term Research Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2018-2019
  • Dean’s Graduate Fellowship, College of Arts & Sciences, University of North Carolina, 2018-2019
  • Evan Frankel Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina, 2017
  • NAVSA Travel Grant, North American Victorian Studies Association, 2017
  • DHSI Tuition Scholarship, “XML: Applications for Historical and Literary Research,” Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria, 2017
  • Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, University of North Carolina, 2016
  • Graduate Innovation Assistantship, Committee for Institutional Studies and Research, Office of the Provost, Murray State University, 2012-2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Eric Bontempo

April 20, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and French, Harding University

2017, MA English, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

Bio

Eric Bontempo is a third-year PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. His interests include nineteenth-century poetics, British Romanticism, aesthetic theory, and postsecular studies.


Publications:

  • “In Memoriam:  Reader-Response and the Virtual Construction of Consolation.” The International Journal of Critical Cultural Studies, vol. 14. no. 4 (2016), pp. 11-18.

Awards

  • UNC Center for Global Initiatives REACH Fellow, Summer 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume