Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Articles

  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading,” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies (forthcoming)
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I,” Women’s Studies, Vol. 47: Issue 3, 317-332, 2018.
  • “Reformatted / Re-fleshed: Gender, the Internet and New Configurations for Embodiment.” Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism: Vol. 7: No. 1, 2014.

Reviews

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Ruth Richardson Award for Outstanding Academic Performance in the First Year of Graduate Study, 2018

Hannah Skjellum

September 11, 2018

Degrees

BA of English Literature, Auburn University, 2017

Bio

My area of study lies in 20th century African American literature with a focus on gender and sexuality studies. I like to say I live in Harlem Renaissance, but I’m also poking out into the later 20th century as well as into film of the 21st.


Travis Townley Alexander

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English and Plan II Honors, The University of Texas at Austin

Bio

Travis is broadly invested in postwar American fiction, film, and visual art. His research specifically clusters around portrayals of the HIV/AIDS epidemic from the 1980s to the present in literary, filmic, and theoretical domains. Travis is particularly interested in the extent to which scripts governing racial representation inform these portrayals.


Publications:

  • “Immunity’s Racial Empire: Virality, Melancholy, Whiteness,” American Literature (revised and resubmitted)
  • “Speaking Fees: Capital, Colony, and Reference in China Mieville’s Embassytown.” LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory1 (forthcoming 2020)
  • “‘A hint of industrial espionage in the eye’: Orientalism, Essayism, and the Politics of Memory in Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil.” Quarterly Review of Film and Video1 (2019): 42 – 61.
  • “Long Live the Old Flesh: AIDS and the Americans with Disabilities Act at Quarter Century.” symplokē1-2 (December 2018): 251 – 266.
  • “Deregulating Grief: A Review of Dagmawi Woubshet’s The Calendar of Loss: Race, Sexuality and Mourning in the Early Era of AIDS,” boundary 2, 2016

Teaching Awards

Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, Spring 2017


Awards

Short Term Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2019

Summer Research Grant, Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Graduate Student Research Award, Program in Sexuality Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Dean’s Distinguished Graduate, College of Liberal Arts (12 students chosen from 2,983 graduates), The University of Texas at Austin, 2013


Anneke Schwob

August 7, 2018

Degrees

2010, S.B. Literature (21L), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010, S.B. Science and Humanities (21S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate whose research interests include American literature and science, the birth of American conservation movements, periodical studies, and natural history. Archival portions of my research have been supported by fellowships from the Science Fiction Society, the Graduate School at UNC, and the Mary and David Harrison Institute at the University of Virginia. My dissertation, In Situ: Environmental Management and the American Literary Imagination, explores how popular, serialized narratives used the scientific project of wilderness exploration and conservation as a tool of literary nationalism in the decades immediately preceding the foundation of the National Parks Service. My research is informed by my background in the biological sciences and a deep personal interest in backpacking and mountaineering.


Awards

  • UNC Graduate School Dissertation Travel Fellowship, 2017
  • National Humanities Center “Humanities in Class” Internship, 2017
  • UVA Lillian Gary Taylor Visiting Fellowship in American Literature, 2017
  • SFS Mullen Research Fellowship, 2016
  • Robert A. Bain Award for Excellence in 19thCentury American Literature, 2014

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Anna Broadwell-Gulde

July 28, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English, Hendrix College

2016, MA Social Sciences, University of Chicago

Bio

My work centers on questions of subjectivity, agency, and desire in twentieth-century American literature and global cinema. Most recently, I have become interested in the relationship between debt and desire as dual economic and psychological forces that structure contemporary experience. Living and teaching abroad (most recently, Brazil) has shaped my approach to literature and film and has enabled me to explore transatlantic cultural and aesthetic influences on literary and cinematic forms.


Publications:

  • “Pilar’s Turn Inward: Storytelling in Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls,” Teaching Hemingway and War, Kent State University Press, 2015.

Awards

  • Fulbright English Teaching Fellowship, Brazil, 2014
  • FLAS Fellowship, Brazil, 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie Kinzinger is a third-year PhD student, who focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.


Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Edward Hyunsoo Yang

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Literature and Political Science, Loyola Marymount University

2015, MA English, Claremont Graduate University

Bio

My research interests include the history of the novel, narrative performance, and authenticity. Drawing from British novels of the Long Eighteenth Century and Twentieth Century American novels, I hope to produce a project that examines narrative interruptions: moments in a text when a voice, distinct from that of any other character, enters the narrative.

Some of my past research examines: the performance of authenticity in The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey, competing narrative frames in Frankenstein, a blending of genres in The Castle of Otranto, resistance to introspection in Mumblecore films, and the role of authenticity in Hip Hop.


Awards

  • Fulbright, English Teaching Assistantship (Germany), 2016-17

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.